Rob Lowe Reflects On 29 Years Of Sobriety

By Bryan Le 05/13/19

The actor shared a message of positivity on Instagram as he celebrated the milestone.

Image: 
December 8: Rob Lowe arrives at the California Hall of Fame ceremonies at the Sacramento Memorial Auditorium in Sacramento, California on December 8, 2011.
Randy Miramontez | Dreamstime.comv

Actor Rob Lowe celebrated 29 years sober from drugs and alcohol in an Instagram post. In the caption of a photo of his younger self, he left some encouraging words to anyone who finds themselves on a similar path to his.

“Today I celebrate 29 years of sobriety. Thank you to all those who have inspired me on this wonderful, challenging and life-changing journey,” he captioned the post. “If you, or someone you know, are struggling with alcohol or addiction, there CAN be a future of hope, health and happiness. And it comes one day at a time. #recovery #ItWorks.”

His post was well-received by fans with over 82,000 likes, including support from big names like actress Demi Moore and supermodel Naomi Campbell. Lowe’s own brother, Chad, also pitched in: “Congratulations!!! Thanks for saving me a seat!!”

Lowe’s son, Johnny, posted in support of his father. “So proud of you. Love you,” wrote Johnny.

Lowe’s alcohol use led him to some dark places, including a 1988 sex tape of himself with a 16-year-old girl in Atlanta, where he was supposed to appear in support of Michael Dukakis at the 1988 Democratic National Convention. He says the incident helped him realize how far he had fallen.

“It ends up being the greatest thing that ever happened to me,” he said in a 2011 interview with Oprah. “Because what it ends up doing is accelerating my alcohol [addiction] to where I finally get sober. I have been able to have the rest of my life that I’m so blessed with, which is now 20 years of sobriety.”

The Parks and Recreation star has been open about his struggles, including how he problematically replaced his substance addictions with exercise.

“It became an outlet for all of the tension, stresses, compulsivity,” said Lowe. “I funneled the addiction, frankly, into that.”

Eventually Lowe was able to approach exercise with a healthier mentality, integrating it as a way to understand himself.

“I don’t want to have the smoothie stand. I don’t want to look at beautiful women when I work out. I like the forced mental solitude of it,” said Lowe. “Inevitably, it will force you to start working through things you’re not going to if you’re listening to Jay-Z.”

Most importantly, he was able to admit to himself that he exercised for the wrong reason—to look good.

“Men deny having vanity—that’s the greatest vanity. Not me. I’m vain as fuck,” confessed Lowe.

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Bryan Le grew up in the 90's, so the Internet is practically his third parent. This combined with a love for journalism led him to The Fix. When he isn't fulfilling his duties as Editorial Coordinator, he's obsessing over fancy keyboards he can't justify buying. Find Bryan on LinkedIn or Twitter

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