Plant Medicine Activists Write Letter To Trump On Ibogaine's Benefits

By McCarton Ackerman 01/31/17

They urged Trump to make the opioid epidemic a priority in his first 100 days in office.

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Advocates of ibogaine wrote a letter to President Donald Trump on how the plant could combat the opioid epidemic.

The letter was composed by Mike “Zappy” Zapolin, founder of Your Mind Has Rights, and Pat Baker, an advocate for using plant medicine to help treat addiction. Zapolin’s movement also advocates for the use of both plant medicine and psychedelics in helping individuals access answers to difficult questions and heal themselves.

“We want to point out to President Trump that the opiate epidemic is as important as the Economy, and Terrorism, since it affects every family in America,” said Zapolin in a press release. Baker added that “we don’t blame anyone for not knowing about Ibogaine, but we need to use the knowledge we have about its efficacy to move quickly, given that so many people are suffering.”

Their joint letter urges Trump to make America’s ongoing epidemic of opioid addiction and overdose a “First 100 Days” issue while in office. Noting that Trump lost his brother to alcoholism, they wrote that he knows “the agonizing pain of watching a loved one die from this disease” and the effect it has on families.

“You have the power to change all of this right now using a natural plant that has been shown for decades to be safe, clinically proven, and very cost effective. A single dose of the plant medicine Ibogaine has been proven to break the addiction to opiates, cocaine, and alcohol, and is safe when done with proper medical oversight,” they wrote.

Adding that patients in numerous countries worldwide have reported the benefits of ibogaine, they added that “continuing to keep it from people who suffer from dependence to heroin, methadone and Suboxone is the equivalent of 'Modern Day Slavery.'”

American shaman Dimitri Mugianis has also been at the forefront of the ibogaine movement as a drug policy activist and spiritual healer. He claims that the plant played an essential role in curing him of a 20-year heroin and cocaine addiction.

“The visions were really healing: childhood trauma would come and be washed away; my common law-wife had died five years before that and I blamed myself for it. I was cleansed of responsibility,” he told The Fix in January 2015. “Some people come out still wanting to use and other people come out angry, but I was praising God over and over again. I came out of it and had absolutely no desire to use ever again, and I haven’t since.”

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McCarton Ackerman is a freelance writer and editor living in Portland, Oregon. He has been a contributor for The Fix since October 2011, writing on a wide range of topics ranging from medical marijuana in Colorado to the world's sexiest drug smugglers. Follow him on Linkedin and Twitter.

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