PGA Golfer Billy Horshel And Wife Brittany Discuss Her Journey To Sobriety

PGA Golfer Billy Horshel And Wife Brittany Discuss Her Journey To Sobriety

By Britni de la Cretaz 10/16/17

"What helped me through this process was a simple equation: I could give up one thing to save everything, or continue to drink and risk losing it all.”

Image: 
Billy and Brittany Horschel
Billy and Brittany Horschel Photo via YouTube

On May 22, 2017, Brittany Horschel announced on social media that she is “an alcoholic,” revealing that she had spent the last year getting treatment for her drinking problem and living in sobriety.

Brittany Horschel's announcement came the day after her husband, professional golfer Billy Horschel, won the AT&T Byron Nelson tournament on her one-year sober anniversary. In a new interview with Golf Digest, the couple opened up about her journey to recovery.

Brittany says she felt a lot of pressure after Billy won the FedEx Cup, which comes with a big payout. Her husband was successful, yet she “never felt more inadequate,” Horschel told Golf Digest.

As a result, she says she fell into a deep depression, which “led to a lot of drinking.” And, while she was lying to Billy—saying everything was okay and that she could control her drinking—“deep down, I was scared and really ashamed.” 

For his part, Billy told the magazine that he and Brittany argued a lot about her drinking. After talking to friends and family, they decided to stage an intervention. “I don't think I realized my wife was an alcoholic,” said Horschel. “Over time you could tell she couldn't control her drinking. Other people would be having drinks with dinner or whatever, but she didn't know when to say ‘No more.’” 

Brittany told the New York Times in June that she decided to share her story in the hopes that it would help others and let them know they’re not alone. Billy has been completely supportive of that, and the couple has done a press tour together to talk about their experience.

She told Golf Digest that the hardest part of getting help was leaving her daughter so she could go to rehab. "What helped me through this process was a simple equation: I could give up one thing to save everything, or continue to drink and risk losing it all,” she said.

Ultimately, she says she’s proud of the person she is today. "I no longer feel this pressure to be perfect, because I know I can't be. No one is,” she says. “I struggled with getting help for so long because it's perceived as so ugly. But when someone can share their recovery story, it's actually really beautiful.”

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Britni de la Cretaz is a freelance writer, baseball enthusiast, and recovered alcoholic living in Boston. Follow her on Twitter at @britnidlc.

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