Morning Roundup: Dec. 5, 2018

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Morning Roundup: Dec. 5, 2018

By The Fix staff 12/05/18

An El Chapo cohort allegedly sank 20,000 kg of cocaine in a boat, UFC champion Max Holloway discusses his struggles with depression, Alice Cooper guitarist details how the rock legend and Nikki Sixx helped her get sober.

Image: 
UFC fighter Max Holloway opened up about his battle with depression.
UFC fighter Max Holloway opened up about his battle with depression. Photo via YouTube

New York Awarded $9 Million To Expand Opioid Addiction Treatment, Services

[Times Union]

The funding includes $5.7 million to expand access to medications that assist individuals through withdrawal and recovery, $2.1 million to develop new recovery centers, and more than $1.3 million for specialized treatment and recovery programs.

Nita Strauss Explains How Alice Cooper Helped Her Stay Sober

[MetalHeadZone]

Strauss, who plays guitar for Alice Cooper, opened up about how Cooper and Nikki Sixx played role in her sobriety on a recent podcast. "I had two great people around that I could ask, which are Alice and Nikki Sixx… Alice is sober over 30 years and I think Nikki at least 10, if not 15 or 20."

El Chapo Cohort Dumped 20,000 kg of Cocaine After Dipping Into Stash

[New York Post]

During recent testimony for El Chapo's trial, it was revealed that the captain of a boat that was reportedly smuggling contraband for the drug lord became unhinged after dipping into the supply. “He started to see ghosts everywhere and American Coast Guard everywhere, and he sunk the ship,” said Colombian cocaine titan Juan Carlos Ramirez of the coked-up captain.

What Marijuana Does To Your Sex Life

[The Verge]

An in-depth analysis explored whether marijuana can help or hinder the sex drives of those who consume it.

Marathon Runner Shares Journey To Sobriety From Opioid Addiction

[Kota TV]

A successful marathon runner discussed how he went from taking 80 painkillers per day to becoming a recovery advocate. He became addicted to painkillers after a hospital stay introduced him to Demerol. He said he's surprised to be alive.

Alcohol-Related Death Among UK Women Hits 10-Year High

[The Guardian]

A new study shows that alcohol-related deaths among women in the UK have reached their highest rate since 2008. According to the Office For National Statistics, deaths caused by alcohol misuse have been rising steadily since 2015. Deaths from alcohol misuse were highest among 60- to 64-year-olds in 2017, at 29.7 per 100,000, overtaking 50- to 54-year-olds, who had the highest rate in 2001. 

UFC Champ Max Holloway Details Battling Depression

[ESPN]

Holloway, who has had to cancel many prominent fights due to depression symptoms, opened up about working on his mental health as he prepares for his next big bout. "It's been a rough year, but it's not how you start the race, it's definitely how you finish," he told ESPN's Ariel Helwani on Monday.

More Than 10,000 Low-Level Marijuana Convictions To Be Vacated In Denver, Mayor Says

[KDVR]

On Tuesday, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock announced a citywide effort to vacate low-level marijuana convictions that occurred before marijuana legalization in Colorado. Between 2001 and 2013, more than 10,000 people were convicted of low-level marijuana-related crimes. “For too long, the lives of low-income residents and those living in our communities of color have been negatively affected by low-level marijuana convictions,” Hancock said in a statement. 

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