Lisa Marie Presley Checks into Rehab For Painkiller Addiction

By Seth Ferranti 08/16/16

Sources claim the stress from her recent divorce pushed the country singer to turn to painkillers.

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Lisa Marie Presley Checks into Rehab For Painkiller Addiction

Lisa Marie Presley, the daughter of rock-n-roll icon Elvis—who suffered through his own drug problems and addiction battles—has checked into rehab at the luxurious $400,000-a-month Hills Treatment Center in Los Angeles, according to Us Weekly.  The country singer, who scored several minor hits of her own with "Lights Out" from 2003’s To Whom It May Concern and "Over Me" from 2012’s Storm and Grace, has battled addiction problems before but credited Scientology for her recovery. Now Us Weekly is reporting that Presley has been struggling with a painkiller addiction.

“She’s doing OK but needed to get this under control,” a source told Us Weekly. With her recent separation from her fourth husband, Michael Lockwood, whom she was married to for 10 years, it seems that Presley is in the news again for all the wrong reasons. The 48-year-old country singer filed for divorce in June citing irreconcilable differences. She requested full custody of the former couple's children, 7-year-old twin daughters, Harper and Finley. She also requested that Lockwood, a musician by trade, only be allowed monitored visits with his kids. Presley has two adult children, 27-year-old actress and model Riley Keough and 23-year-old Benjamin from her marriage to musician Danny Keough.

Presley also has a history with substance abuse. She’s battled her drug and alcohol issues for decades, telling Paper magazine in 2003 about how a three-day bender at 18 led her to Scientology, which changed her life.

"I was on a 72-hour bender. Cocaine, sedatives, pot and drinking—all at the same time. I never got my hands on heroin, but it's not like I wouldn't have taken it. I just couldn't be sober. I don't know how I lived through it. I woke up one day with a bunch of people on the floor, and the coke dealer was in the room, and I said, 'Everybody get the fuck out! That's it. I'm done.' I drove myself to the Church of Scientology and said: 'Somebody fucking help me right now.' They jumped in, not in a rehab way. It wasn't that. It was like, 'Help me, I'm fucked, and I want to stop. I want to know what I'm doing here. I want to know why I'm here. What's wrong with me? I want answers to all these questions.'"

In June, Presley’s lawyer, Ronald Litz, talked to People magazine about Presley's status. “It’s tough on her, but she’s going to get through it. There’s so much stress and nonsense that goes on during divorce. But she’ll be fine ultimately,” he said. At $400,000 a month, Presley will have every opportunity to get the treatment she needs and get her life back on track. 

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After landing on the US Marshals Top-15 Most Wanted list and being sentenced to a 25 year sentence in federal prison for a first-time, nonviolent LSD offense, Seth built a writing and journalism career from his cell block. His raw portrayals of prison life and crack era gangsters graced the pages of Don DivaHoopshype and VICE. From prison he established Gorilla Convict, a true-crime publisher and website that documents the stories that the mainstream media can’t get with books like Prison Stories and Street Legends. His story has been covered by The Washington PostThe Washington Times, and Rolling Stone.

Since his release in 2015 he’s worked hard to launch GR1ND Studios, where true crime and comics clash. GR1ND Studios is bringing variety to the comic shelf by way of the American underground. These groundbreaking graphic novels tell the true story of prohibition-era mobsters, inner-city drug lords, and suburban drug dealers. Seth is currently working out of St. Louis, Missouri, writing for The FixVICEOZY, Daily Beast, and Penthouse and moving into the world of film. Check out his first short, Easter Bunny Assassin at sethferranti.com. You can find Seth on Linkedin or follow him on Twitter.

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