Former Super Bowl Champ Derek Loville Indicted On Drug Trafficking Charges

By McCarton Ackerman 01/29/16

The former Denver Bronco was one of 22 people swept up in a large federal indictment.

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Derek Loville could soon be going from the Super Bowl to the big house. The former Denver Broncos running back and two-time Super Bowl champion has been indicted on drug trafficking charges.

Loville was one of 22 defendants named in the massive federal grand jury indictment. He was released without bail after appearing before a federal magistrate judge last Wednesday in Phoenix, but ordered to appear in San Diego. 

The former football star was reportedly part of an operation known as ODOG Enterprise, which was led by Owen “O-Dog” Hanson, a former football player at the University of Southern California. The indictment alleges that Loville received drugs from Hanson in September 2014, sold them to unnamed individuals in Phoenix and then deposited $1,150 into Hanson’s bank account two days later. He’s also accused of participating in a racketeering conspiracy with Hanson and several other defendants, which could carry a potential life sentence.

The international drug trafficking, money laundering, and sports gambling room used graphic scare tactics to get debtors to pay up, such as showing them beheading videos. They also retained the services of San Diego accountant Luke Fairfield, who is also named in the indictment, to help launder the money by setting up shell corporations.

The case was broken open for the FBI by a man who is only being identified as Robin Hood 702. He became a primary target for ODOG Enterprise after he declined to launder them $20 million. In response, they sent a DVD to his home of two men being beheaded by two individuals holding a butcher’s knife and chainsaw. Hanson also allegedly mailed a picture of himself in a Luchador wrestling mask and holding a shovel at the gravesite of Robin Hood 702’s parents, where he had splattered blood-red paint on their tombstone.

“A family member opened the DVD thinking it was a video of her sister’s newborn baby,” he explained. “Then she watched it and freaked out. She had nightmares for years. [But] when they desecrated my mother and father’s grave site, I knew I had to put these guys in jail for a long time.”

Since retiring from the NFL, Loville had been working as an insurance broker in the Scottsdale area.

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McCarton Ackerman is a freelance writer and editor living in Portland, Oregon. He has been a contributor for The Fix since October 2011, writing on a wide range of topics ranging from medical marijuana in Colorado to the world's sexiest drug smugglers. Follow him on Linkedin and Twitter.

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