Wife Of Creed Singer Blames Drug Use For His Very Public Meltdown

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Wife Of Creed Singer Blames Drug Use For His Very Public Meltdown

By McCarton Ackerman 12/02/14

A series of bizarre public outbursts have led to the conclusion that Stapp has apparently fallen off the wagon.

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Scott Stapp sold nearly 50 million albums as the lead singer of Creed and amassed a $30 million fortune, but his estranged wife claims that drug use has led the once sober singer into homelessness and poverty.

In a 15-minute video posted last week on his Facebook page, Stapp said that during “an audit of my record and my personal finances…a lot of things were uncovered” and that “a lot of money was stolen from me.” He said that he has bounced between sleeping in his truck and at a Holiday Inn, in addition to going without food at times.

But his wife, Jaclyn, said in her divorce petition earlier this month that his drug use led to their demise. Scott had remained sober for several years, but she claimed he is now off the wagon and abusing amphetamines, crystal meth, and steroids. Jaclyn said he disappeared from their home nearly two months ago and has been sending her bizarre text messages since, including one which said, “I’m coming to get you Satan and children. No mercy. You know how this ends. God created you and now God is ending you.”

Even his 16-year-old son, Jagger, slammed the singer on Twitter. “My dad is too busy posting songs on his FB hiding out for attention rather then [sic] getting his act together #dadstop,” he wrote. “To all those confused, my father once again chose drugs over his family. He needs help, but refuses to get it. He’s been on a 9 week binge.”

The singer was placed on an involuntary 72-hour psych hold last month after police found him drunk and rambling incoherently. He also said in a radio interview last week that his financial demise began after he criticized President Barack Obama during a 2012 Fox News interview. Over the weekend, Scott shamelessly created a $480,000 crowdfunding campaign to record his new album and write a novel.

His drinking and depression has led to numerous high-profile incidents that included a 2006 arrest for suspected intoxication and a 2007 felony assault charge (later dropped) against his first wife. In his 2012 memoir, Sinner’s Creed, he also revealed that he nearly died after a drug-induced hallucination led to him falling from the balcony of his 16th floor hotel room in Miami Beach. But it was only when he didn’t make it home for Christmas with his family years later that he knew something had to change.

“I was in New York on Christmas Eve in 2010 with my wife and she suggested we stop at a bar for a couple of drinks. I blacked out, didn’t come home for Christmas and ended up in a hospital for three days,” he exclusively told The Fix last December. “I was like, ‘I can’t believe I just did this.’ It really hit home. After that, I went to rehab for 44 days at Willingway in Statesboro, Georgia and began my journey."

Stapp had been in recovery since November 2010 and admitted to two relapses since that time, but appeared determined to beat his addiction.

“The biggest thing is that I made my touring environment a sober one,” he said. “I can’t require people to be sober the whole tour, but I can require my buses and the backstage area to be sober. It’s fine if people want to drink, but they need to do it in their hotel or away from the venue. That seems to have been a good thing.”

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McCarton Ackerman is a freelance writer and editor living in Portland, Oregon. He has been a contributor for The Fix since October 2011, writing on a wide range of topics ranging from medical marijuana in Colorado to the world's sexiest drug smugglers. Follow him on Linkedin and Twitter.

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