The Fix Is "Exhibit A" in Courtney Love Case

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The Fix Is "Exhibit A" in Courtney Love Case

By Carmela Kelly 09/11/12

Courtney Love's lawyer fires back against a libel suit, filing an objection to the way his opponent gave information to The Fix.

Image: 
Screen Shot 2012-09-11 at 4.30.47 PM.png
Part of the document that Kenneth Freundlich
filed September 4

Fix article features in the latest court document filed by Courtney Love's legal representatives. As we reported last month, one of the many cases Love faces is a libel suit launched by her former attorney, Rhonda Holmes, that makes allegations including malicious tweeting and the singer's inability to refrain from substance abuse. Love failed to show up for a scheduled deposition in New York on August 23. Later that day, Rhonda Holmes' lawyer, Frederic Gordon, told The Fix that Love's new attorney, Kenneth Freundlich, lied "under penalty of perjury" about the date that he'd submitted Love's objection to the deposition—an episode that Gordon described as "another significant episode of Courtney thinking she's above the law." 

Freundlich showed just how unhappy he was about this claim in a document he filed for the case last week—which included our report as "Exhibit A." Freundlich states in the document: "On August 23, 2012, I received a call from a woman who identified herself as Internet reporter Carmela Kelly asking about the noticing of Love’s appearance, which was a private matter not in any public file." He continues, “I ascertained from Ms. Kelly that plaintiff’s counsel Frederic Gordon had called Ms. Kelly to 'update' her as to the minutiae progress of the matter. During this call, Mr. Gordon, whom I have never met, had the audacity to accuse me of committing perjury which was a totally baseless allegation and Ms. Kelly published that baseless allegation in her column. Attached as Exhibit A is a true and correct copy of Ms. Kelly’s article which was spurred on by the phone call from Mr. Gordon.” 

It didn't happen quite like that, says this reporter, who contacted Frederic Gordon (rather than the other way round) months earlier concerning another case against Love. Gordon got back in touch last month to ask if this reporter knew the identity of Love's new legal representation—which she did—as he had a deposition coming up. He then shared the information on the Holmes suit—but only when asked.

Freundlich's filing was made "Joining in and in support of third party witness Frances Bean Cobain's motion for a protective order," seeking to protect Bean—who was subpoenaed by the Holmes camp—from being called as a witness on the basis that she "does not have any relevant knowledge or documents to offer." Freundlich contends that Holmes' libel suit is intended "to harass Love and her family members into submission" by reporting the "tiniest details" of the case to the press, accusing Freundlich of perjury "without a whit of evidence," and "including privileged matter in the complaint...concerning Love's struggle with sobriety, which was sure to attract media attention in this case."

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