AMC Creating Miniseries Based On David Carr's Addiction Memoir

By Paul Gaita 06/10/16

The six-part miniseries will star Bob Odenkirk, who was also the subject of one of Carr's final stories for the New York Times.

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AMC Creating Miniseries Based On David Carr's Addiction Memoir

Actor-comedian Bob Odenkirk will star in The Night of the Gun, a miniseries for AMC based on the best-selling memoir about journalism and addiction by the late New York Times media critic David Carr. Odenkirk, who currently leads the acclaimed drama Better Call Saul on AMC, will play Carr, who wrote the Media Equation column for the Times’ business section, and was the newspaper's awards-season correspondent for the Carpetbagger blog. Shawn Ryan, creator of The Shield, will write the project, which is planned as a six-part miniseries, while Odenkirk will also serve as executive producer.

Carr, who also wrote for the Atlantic Monthly and Twin Cities Reader and edited Washington, D.C.’s City Paper, was revered by readers and fellow journalists alike for his no-nonsense approach to both the entertainment and media scenes in the Times, dealing out praise and scorn in equally passionate terms. He championed free speech and media innovation, and contributed to the downfall of both the unpopular Tribune Company chief executive Randy Michaels and NBC anchor Brian Williams after it was revealed that he lied about being under fire in Iraq in 2003. “David Carr’s work as a journalist was uncompromising, enlightening, and most of all, always driven by a fundamental quest for the truth,” said Joel Stillerman, president of original programming and development for AMC and SundanceTV.

In 2008, Carr penned The Night of the Gun, an often-harrowing recollection of his addiction to crack cocaine in the late 1980s and eventual recovery through a treatment program. “I read David’s story when it came out and was wildly entertained by his saga,” said Odenkirk. “It’s a story of survival filled with pain, crack, journalistic righteousness, abandoned cars, crooks, lies, and then there’s the two little girls who saved his life; it’s overstuffed with humanity.”

Odenkirk was the subject of one of Carr’s final stories for the Times, in which he praised the comedian’s dramatic talents. Less than a month later, Carr collapsed at the newspaper’s offices shortly after moderating a panel on the Oscar-nominated documentary Citizenfour and died on the evening of February 12, 2015 from complications from lung cancer and heart disease. 

No start or release dates have been announced for the production. The third season of Saul was announced by AMC in March 2016.

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Paul Gaita lives in Los Angeles. He has contributed to the Los Angeles Times, Variety, LA Weekly, Amazon.com and The Los Angeles Beat, among many other publications and websites. 

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