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Snail Venom Has Potential to Create Powerful New Painkillers

Though still in the research phase, the venom-filled treatment could produce a new class of drugs one hundred times more powerful than morphine.

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By McCarton Ackerman

03/25/14

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Ocean-dwelling cone snails have become responsible for one of the most powerful drugs on the planet. Australian researchers have created a drug using venom from cone snails that is reportedly 100 times more powerful than morphine and “appeared to significantly reduce pain.”

The Sydney Morning Herald has noted that the still-unnamed drug doesn’t have the addictive components of other painkillers. The primary ingredient in the drug is conotoxin, a compound secreted by cone snails.

But as of now, it has only been tested on rats and a human trial is still two years away. "We don't know about side effects yet, as it hasn't been tested in humans. But we think it would be safe," said lead researcher David Craik of the University of Queensland in Australia. The goal of the drug is to manage neuropathic pain, which affects 15 percent of the U.S. population and can arise from cancer, AIDS, diabetes, and other debilitating diseases.

Craik thinks that the venom-filled treatment could open up a "whole new class of drugs capable of relieving one of the most severe forms of chronic pain that is currently very difficult to treat." A painkiller with conotoxin called ziconotide has already been approved for human use, but is not available in pill form and requires a spinal cord injection.

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