First Annual Cannabis Summit Coming to Denver

First Annual Cannabis Summit Coming to Denver

By Paul Gaita 03/25/14

The aim of the two-day conference to be held this coming June is to address the real-world issues facing marijuana business owners while also raising money to advance industry policy goals.

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The National Cannabis Industry Association (NCIA) will present its first national conference in Denver, Colorado on June 24 and 25, 2014. The Cannabis Business Summit promises more than 35 sessions and 800 attendees, as well as an exhibition floor featuring more than 30 cannabis-related companies in an attempt to present a national forum for cannabis business owners to discuss practices and developments in their rapidly growing industry.

The summit, which will take place at the Colorado Convention Center in downtown Denver, will also feature educational sessions with “leading pioneers and innovators” from the cannabis industry while also addressing real-world issues facing business owners, including banking and taxation, investments, security and compliance for business owners and customers, industry insurance, marketing, philanthropy, and community engagement.

In addition to the sessions and exhibitor showcase, the summit will contain a fundraising session to support the NCIA’s efforts to advance “policy goals” within the industry. Registration forms and other information regarding the summit are available on its web site; admission prices are steep – “early bird” registration for non-NCIA members is $695, while members can admit two representatives from their company for $450.

Admission to the fundraiser is an additional $100, while the cost to become a member of NCIA is $950. Those who believe that the price tag for the conference seems a bit steep should consider that tax revenues for the first month of legal recreational pot sales in Colorado earned the state $2 million; when revenue from medical marijuana sales was added to this figure, the Colorado marijuana industry pulled in $3.5 million – more than the state’s average monthly sales for alcohol.