"Caravan For Peace" Sets Out to End Drug War

"Caravan For Peace" Sets Out to End Drug War

By Chrisanne Grise 08/10/12

Mexican and American organizations unite to search for non-violent solutions across the US, starting Sunday.

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"Giving a voice to the families of victims." Photo via

With death toll of the bloody Mexican drug war rising as high as 71,000, dozens of Mexican and American organizations will embark on a month-long “Caravan for Peace” on Sunday, August 12. Its aim is to spread awareness and open dialog about non-violent solutions with citizens and leaders in both countries. Ideally, the caravan—which is purposely timed between the two nations' presidential elections—will revise their relationship, promoting a view of Mexico as a neighbor, not a threat.

“We are dedicated to giving voice to the families of victims of this violence and to publicizing the real costs of this war,” says Javier Sicilia, a poet who was named one of Time’s 2012 “Person of the Year” activists; cartel members murdered his son in 2010. He's joining the Movement for Peace with Justice and Dignity (MPJD) to lead the caravan. “We have made it clear that the Mexican state must stop denying its responsibilities, which it does by criminalizing the victims of violence,” he says. “Instead, it must accept that there are victims, and that it is the Mexican government’s responsibility to provide justice and reparations to them. With this in mind, we have asked for a change from the current security strategy to one focused on human security.” That said, the goal is also to influence American drug-war strategy; Sicilia says he hopes to promote discussion about US policies in areas such as gun trafficking, alternatives to drug prohibition, combating money laundering and bilateral cooperation over human rights and security.

The trek will cover 6,000 miles and stop in 20 US cities, starting in San Diego on Sunday and arriving in Washington, DC, on September 10. Each stop along the way will feature rallies and debate. Other organizations involved in the initiative include the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP) and the Drug Policy Alliance (DPA). A similar caravan crossed Mexico last year, and is credited with pushing the drug war up the country’s political agenda. Anyone interested can join the caravan as a volunteer, track the route online, or register to ride on one of the caravan buses or to follow along in your own car.