Alcohol’s Role in Migraines is Overhyped, Say Researchers

Alcohol’s Role in Migraines is Overhyped, Say Researchers

By Dirk Hanson 06/15/11

Menstruation, stress, and fatigue are more likely to trigger migraines than booze.

Image: 
It's all in your head.
Photo via thinkstockphotos

Alcohol, long considered a common trigger for migraine headaches, may not be a major culprit after all. New research on the disease, which afflicts about 15% of the population, shows that most patients who exclude foods and drinks considered to be triggers do not become headache-free. While alcoholic drinks can trigger headaches in about one-third of migraine patients, “menstruation, stress, and fatigue were found most commonly to relate to a subsequent attack,” says the Boston University School of Medicine. And a study in the Journal of Headache Pain found that “only 10% of migraine patients reported alcohol as a migraine trigger frequently.” To confuse things even more, the study found that beer consumption on the previous day actually reduced the risk of a migraine attack. “Patients with migraines have a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease,” and therefore might even benefit “from moderate wine/alcohol consumption.” The researchers conclude that the evidence “does not justify the consideration that alcohol is a major trigger and the suggestion of abstinence.” And an earlier study by Austrian researchers found “limited importance of nutrition, including alcoholic beverages in the precipitation of migraine.”